Archive for the Doggy Owner Tips Category

Budget-Friendly Tips for Getaways with Your Furry Best Friend





Image courtesy of Unsplash

This guest article was written by Nick Burton.

Are you and Fido ready to hit the road and make some memories? Adventures with a beloved canine companion can quickly go downhill without preparation. Here’s how to ensure you and your pooch will not only have the best of times, you won’t overspend in the process. 

Accessories to Ease Travel

A few well-chosen accessories can go a long way toward ensuring you and your dog stay comfortable and safe throughout your travels. There are bowls specially designed to collapse so meals and storage are easy-breezy, and car seat covers to protect your vehicle from hair, muddy paws, slobber, and any unexpected accidents.

When it comes to keeping your sidekick in his seat, choose a restraint that is fitting for your dog’s size and personality type. If you have a small dog who isn’t overly active, a booster seat or safety harness could be perfect. Bigger dogs can also enjoy the freedom and safety of a harness, and active dogs can benefit from a carrier or crate. 

For the accessories you and Fido need, stretch your travel budget by shopping online and using offers such as Ebates coupons and discount codes from your favorite retailers. You can apply the funds you save toward your and your dog’s fun.

Places to Go, Things to Do

Strange as it is to some of us, there are places that don’t welcome dogs. With that in mind, long before you pack Fido’s bags, do some research to ensure you and your pooch are heading somewhere you’ll both enjoy. And for those times you need to leave your dog alone, make arrangements for a trustworthy pet sitter to take care of your traveling companion. It’ll ease your mind knowing someone is tending him, rather than worrying that he’s stressed out. 

There are dog-friendly destinations far and wide for nearly anything that suits your fancy. If ocean waves, sands, and seagulls beckon, Travel + Leisure notes there are some outstanding dog-friendly beaches, such as the dog beach in Florida’s Fort Myers, Jekyll Island Beach in Georgia, and Topsail Beach in North Carolina. Exploring national parks can be big fun as well, but make sure you do some checking because some are more dog-friendly than others. More in the mood for urban adventures? Look to cities like Chicago, Seattle, or Denver. Finding places that encourage your pooch to be himself will ensure you make the most of every moment. 

When booking lodging, make reservations with pet-friendly hotels or vacation rentals. Websites like Expedia make it super simple to find the accommodations you want since you can search by pet-friendliness, and on top of that, joining their rewards program can stretch your budget. 

Bells and Whistles

You might be surprised to learn you don’t need to do all the driving when you reach your destination. You can save money by using public transportation in many locations; just verify restrictions before you and your pooch climb aboard, since some systems require a carrier. 

Along those same lines, it’s important to be conscientious of other travelers throughout your journey. If you and your dog are planning potentially muddy outings, like to a dog park or on hiking trails, bring along a paw washing device to tidy up before you hop into a bus, board a train, or re-enter your hotel. For example, the Dexas Mudbuster is small, convenient, and affordable, and you can explore their current offers to make the most of your money.

Of course, throughout your travels, you’ll want to clean up after your dog, so have a plan in place for dealing with waste. An economical solution is the GoGo Stik — it’s a clean, durable, efficient design, convenient to operate, and you can use any style bag so there is just the one-time purchase — all topped off with a money-back guarantee. 

Planning a getaway with your dog needn’t be complex or expensive. Accessorize appropriately, make arrangements in dog-friendly places, and grab a few gadgets to make comings and goings a breeze. With these smart strategies, you and your best friend will have a terrific time!

Canine Autism and Vaccinations?

Canine Autism and Vaccinations?

Here is an outstanding article on this subject from Karin Brulliard is a national reporter who runs the Animalia blog. Previously, she was an international news editor; a foreign correspondent in South Africa, Pakistan and Israel; and a local reporter.

The British Veterinary Association, which represents thousands of practitioners in the United Kingdom, felt compelled to hop onto Twitter last week to issue a notable statement: “There’s currently no reliable scientific evidence to indicate autism in dogs (or its link to vaccines),” the group wrote.

The tweet came in response to a widely condemned call-out from the television show “Good Morning Britain” for interviews with pet owners who believe their dogs developed “canine autism” as a result of vaccines or who refuse routine shots over worries about side effects. But the association also suggested its response had roots across the Atlantic: “We are aware of an increase in anti-vaccination pet owners in the U.S.,” it said, “who have voiced concerns that vaccinations may lead to their dogs developing autism-like behavior.”

Has the anti-vaccine movement, which has fueled measles outbreaks in recent years, spread to American pets?

Not exactly, according to major veterinary groups in this country. John de Jong, a Boston-area veterinarian and incoming president of the American Veterinary Medical Association, said his organization firmly agrees with its British counterpart: There’s no evidence for autism in dogs or any link to vaccines — a theory that has been thoroughly discredited in humans. But he also said he has never been asked by a client about this notion, nor does he know of other veterinarians who have.

Heather Loenser, a senior veterinary officer with the American Animal Hospital Association, echoed that.

“I have never had a client voice that concern,” Loenser, who practices in New Jersey, wrote in an email, adding that she has only “seen it pop up on social media from time to time.”

No one tracks pet vaccination rates. That said, both Loenser and de Jong said they’ve seen small increases in clients who question the necessity or frequency of pet vaccinations. De Jong said some are influenced by breeders who tell buyers to wait on shots until after a dog has produced litters, while others express a vaguer skepticism about possible side effects.

More generally, he said, the doubts are reflective of a pet “humanization” trend that has driven a surge in organic and grain-free pet food sales, expensive and invasive end-of-life care, and doggy fitness centers.

“It’s fair to say that a lot of what we see in veterinary medicine seems to follow the curve of what’s popular in human medicine,” de Jong said. “The human-animal bond is at an all-time high, and people consider their pets as extended members of the family.”

The rabies vaccine is required by law for dogs and cats in most states. Other “core” vaccines, including those for distemper and parvovirus in dogs, are strongly recommended. They have been highly effective, veterinarians point out. Rabies has been eradicated in domestic canines, and distemper is extremely rare. De Jong said he treated dogs with parvovirus as a veterinary student in the early 1980s but now seldom sees it.

“If you take a look at the general health and longevity of both animals and people in society today, we have longer and healthier lives due to preventive medications, preventive health care, good diets and vaccines,” he said.

Vaccines can have minor side effects like swelling and very rarely more serious ones. And although pets typically are offered a series of immunizations, pet owners can discuss with their veterinarians which ones, other than rabies, are critical. A cat living in a high-rise condo, for example, might not need a vaccine for leukemia, de Jong said.

“Many of our North American colleagues believe, as I do, that vaccines should be tailored to the individual pet based on the animal’s risk factors and lifestyle,” said Loenser, whose organization offers an online “lifestyle-based vaccine calculator” to help guide owners’ conversations with their vets.

While de Jong said the veterinary association has detected no major cause for alarm about anti-vaccination-driven outbreaks in pets, he emphasized how much he hopes the idea doesn’t spread. Many diseases against which pets are immunized, such as rabies, can infect both animals and people.

“Widespread use of vaccines has prevented death and disease in millions and millions of animals,” he said. “The benefits far outweigh the risks, by a mile.”

New use for the GoGo Stik!

New use for the GoGo Stik!

Subject: New use for the GoGo Stik!

Dear GoGo Stik,
Wanted to let you know about another application for the scooper. It has worked well in cleaning up after two dogs in the back yard for the past year, I appreciate the no-hassle cleanup. My Vet recently asked for a three day first AM urine sample from our older pet as he is diagnosing a possible kidney issue. I thought about the best way to get the sample from our short female dog and knew it would not be easy or clean.
The GoGo Stik immediately came to mind. With the addition of a zip-loc bag, I was able to get my sample by simply holding the open bag under her to catch the stream without disruption, mess, or upsetting her during her first morning tinkle. Great adaptation of a very useful tool. Kacey has been cleared of any kidney issues and we owe you a “thanks” for making our part of the diagnostic process a breeze.

Joe & Cathy
Upstate NY.

Pumpkin Spice Dog Biscuit Recipe

Pumpkin Spice Dog Biscuit Recipe

Pumpkin Spice Dog Biscuit Recipie:
goodbiscuits

We know that your dog is a special member of your family, With that in mind, we want our blog to reflect the special place the hold in your home. This means sharing news, recipes, tips and tricks to help you care for your all of your family.

This week, that includes a recipe we found for homemade Pumpkin Spice Dog Biscuits. We know this time of year, pumpkin spice everything comes on the market. Because not all of the pet treats you find in the store are the healthiest option for your pet, we will share with you a way to treat your pet and feel good about it.

Pumpkin Spice Dog Biscuts:

Recipe type: Doggie Treats

Prep time:  20 mins

Cook time:  40 mins

Total time:  1 hour

We hope your dog loves it as much as ours did.

A healthy, yummy treat for your best friend!


Ingredients Dog Biscuts

  • 2½ cups whole wheat flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup canned pumpkin
  • 2 tablespoons peanut butter
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees
  2. In a stand mixer, mix together the flour, eggs, pumpkin, peanut butter, salt, and cinnamon
  3. Add water as needed to help make the dough workable, but the dough should be dry and stiff.
  4. Roll the dough into a ½-inch-thick roll. Cut into ½-inch pieces.
  5. Bake in preheated oven until hard, about 40 minutes.

 

The author of this recipe states on her blog, that she developed it after finding that the dog treats in her cupboards, did not pass muster. She shared this and it looked so dare we say yummy, we wanted to share it with you.

We hope your dog loves it as Max did.

Recipe Source:
http://amuseinmykitchen.com/2012/01/11/woofies/

 

 

Emergency Dog Care Check List

Do you have an emergency dog care check list?  Many of you know that your family is ready, but have you stopped to think if you are ready for your pet too?
Our dogs are such important members of our families. We have been watching the news stories about the fires out west and hearing about a strong hurricane season.
This can add up to some very concerned pet owners trying to figure out how to prepare everyone in the house for an emergency. To help you do this, we have put together an emergency preparedness check list.
Feel free to download the pdf or print this out.

Screen Shot 2015-09-17 at 1.38.51 PM

Dog Duty: Laws About Owning a Dog in Arizona

Dog Duty: Laws About Owning a Dog in Arizona arizona-state-seal-color

Arizona! Arizona took an amazing step forward in its laws to protect dogs recently. A Federal Judge just upheld a 20013 ordnance that any dog or cat (yes there are still cat people out there) that is sold in a pet store MUST come from a pet shelter or not for profit rescue organization.

This ruling if passed, will strike a firm blow to puppy mills in the state. According to this article the case stemmed from a puppy mill that was selling 500 puppies a year. That was only a portion of the 41,000 dogs sold per year in Arizona. 

We are not sure what impact the short term dog supply will be, but we are rejoicing that this will have a dramatic and instant impact on the kill rates of un-adopted dogs and cats. Court documents from the case showed that in Maricopa County run animal shelters took in more than 38,200 animals, with 34,000 of those dogs being put down. These numbers do not appear to take in account local not for profit shelters.  If you are looking for a pure bread or a dog that you can learn its history, you can still purchase from a registered small breeder (defined as four or less breading females). 

Since you now have an even better chance at bringing home a shelter pet (Trust us, these dogs are often grateful and even more loving) you may want to be aware of other laws in Arizona about owning a dog.

These laws, far as the state goes can be found here. To briefly sum up what the state laws cover, it’s typical to most states. They refer to dog bites, leashing, and vaccinations. 

It does initially look like that in Arizona they appreciate the companionship and protection of dogs. When you read quickly through the statute listing above or below, dog bites that occur on private property only refer to guest or workers within the confines of their job duties. We find it interesting that it does not specify, list trespassers or unwanted persons.

Arizona is a very pro puppy state. Enjoy those little buddies! 

 

Links:

http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/business/2015/07/court-ruling-on-phoenix-pet-sale-law-sheds-light.html

https://www.animallaw.info/statute/az-dog-arizona-consolidated-dog-laws

http://www.trueactivist.com/arizona-rules-all-dogs-sold-in-pet-stores-to-come-from-shelters/

Dog Duty: Laws About Owning a Dog in Iowa

Dog Duty: Laws About Owning a Dog in IowaIowa-StateSeal.svg

Iowa has been in the news the last few weeks as candidates gather for the 2015 Primary Caucus. You would think with all of the media coverage that Iowa lives and breathes politics, but really they are a dog loving state. 

Iowa has a deep history of their love of their four legged companions and their laws reflect that. They have many laws in place to protect their dogs from disease, pregnancy (which leads to over population and possible death of the female if the pregnancy is not medically overseen) and abuse. 

In Iowa, they have very strictly written laws about sterilization. Those who wish to adopt a dog from a pound or shelter may only do so once they are altered. The adoption of an unaltered animal can result in a misdemeanor charge. This kind of charge and leave you in some hot water anywhere from 30 days in jail and a fine of $625 up to one year in jail and $1875 in fines.  In Iowa they consider it abusive to not spay or neuter a dog.  

Now when it comes to animal abuse in Iowa, actual physical abuse, this state does not mess around. 

Here is a copy of their statute on the laws:

Animal abuse is defined as: “intentionally injures, maims, disfigures, or destroys an animal owned by another person, in any manner, including intentionally poisoning the animal” This is an Aggravated Misdemeanor with a fine of $500 to $5000 and/or imprisonment up to 2 years. 

Animal Neglect is defined as: “fails to supply the animal during confinement with a sufficient quantity of food or water; fails to provide a confined dog or cat with adequate shelter; or tortures, deprives of necessary sustenance, mutilates, beats, or kills an animal by any means which causes unjustified pain, distress, or suffering.”

 Negligent animal neglect is a Simple Misdemeanor which carries a fine of $50 to $500 and/or imprisonment up to 30 days. Intentional Neglect is a Serious Misdemeanor with a fine of $250 to $1500 and/or imprisonment up to 1 year. 

Animal Torture is defined as: “regardless of whether the person is the owner of the animal, if the person inflicts upon the animal severe physical pain with a depraved or sadistic intent to cause prolonged suffering or death.” This is an Aggravated Misdemeanor with a fine of $500 to $5000 and/or imprisonment up to 2 years and psychological treatment. A second conviction of 

Animal Torture is a Class D Felony with a fine of $500 to $7500 and/or imprisonment up to 5 years and psychological treatment.

 Exemptions are made for owner’s consent (except torture), carrying out an order of the court, veterinary practice, hunting, trapping, fishing, protecting person or property, destroying a diseased or injured animal to a degree that would cause severe or prolonged suffering.

Wow! They spell it all out for you. Don’t hurt dogs in Iowa. 

Now if you are looking to visit Iowa, please do not let these laws scare you away. In fact, if you are a guest in their fine state they have special laws just for you. Did you know if you are traveling through or just visiting the state you are not required to have the same vaccination requirements of local animals. However, we would recommend that you look into the vaccinations if you are going hunting or going to a show. These, much like airports for humans, are places where your pet will come into contact with germs potentially not native to their home environment.  We would recommend that you check with your vet and see if there is a vaccination that they would recommend for your traveling companion. 

 

For more information about laws on dog owner ship and care in Iowa, here are our source links.

https://www.animallaw.info/statute/ia-dog-iowa-dangerous-doggeneral-dog-laws

http://www.legis.state.ia.us/IACODE/2003/717B

http://myiowadefenselawyer.com/criminal-offenses/

http://resources.lawinfo.com/insurance/pet-law/iowa/do-i-need-to-vaccinate-my-dog-if-i-am-just-tr.html

GO GO and get this Stik!!! Says Barbara Nicholson

GO GO and get this Stik!!!

on August 21, 2015

This is one of the best purchases I’ve made in a long time! It has made my life so much easier! I was so sick of picking up after my two dogs multiple times a day using grocery bags and my hand. I have long nails and often the bag would puncture while I was scooping and you can imagine this was not fun!

I was searching for a solution and looking into rakes and claws and many pooper scooper options before finding the GoGo Stik. The problem with the other options was that my older dog does loose stools and I didn’t want to have to clean the rake or claw every time I used it. I also didn’t want a system that required me to buy special bags. The GoGo Stik fit the bill on all counts. The unit stays clean because it is completely covered with a bag. I can use any standard grocery bag with handle so it is economical and I can recycle my bags using them again.

The bag is easy to attach, and what is great is I use way less bags. I used to have to use a new bag per pile because it was hard to pick up multiple piles without making a mess. Now one bag is enough for our entire walk for both dogs! I just scoop and shake it down into the bottom of the bag and I’m ready to pick up the next pile. It even does a great job on the soft stuff. It scrapes it off the grass better than I could do with my bag covered hand.

The GoGo Stik is also very light and I have no trouble carrying it all around the block on our walks. I generally carry it in a way that it balances against my arm which makes it even lighter feeling. (Doesn’t hurt that I can hold it far enough away that I don’t have to smell the contents!).

So all in all I would highly recommend this product to anyone who has to pick up after a pet.