Archive for the H3-News Category

Dootie Bags On Sale Now!

Get a deal on our biodegradable Dootie Bags now in our online store!

DootieBagsLogo

Dootie Bags are the perfect companion for your GoGo Stik®!

Large, strong, biodegradable Dootie Bags are designed to fit your GoGo Stik just right, and they’re big enough for whole-yard cleanup!
Dootie Bags are made of lightweight, strong, leakproof bioplastic (HDPE and Corn starch), and printed with water-based inks, so unlike other pet waste bags, they won’t live forever in a landfill.

Now you can have the perfect one-two clean up system to keep your yard and walks pet-waste free, and help reduce plastic waste too.

Dootie Bags Are On Sale Now!

Correctly Using the GoGo Stik E-Z Wedge

Hi Fur-bies lovers! I just received a concern from a customer that recently ordered the GoGo Stik E-Z Clean Scoop Set. The set consists of the ST pooper scooper and the E-Z Wedge. The concern was with use of the E-Z Wedge.

The Wedge tool should be used and viewed as a  “Wedge” and not a rake or small shovel scoop. The wedge should actually be positioned or “Wedged” at one edge of your target poo. Then, the scooper does the scooping. Simple as that.

I have a very short 20 second youtube video that shows this technique here:  https://youtu.be/pQOSgKcXSPg

As always, feel free to contact me if I can offer further assistance. Either through ab@gogostik.com or 315-264-5210. 🙂

Happy Scoopin’!

Alec Beaton

Pooch Approved Products, USA

GoGo Stik ST pooper scooper with E-Z Wedge

Budget-Friendly Tips for Getaways with Your Furry Best Friend





Image courtesy of Unsplash

This guest article was written by Nick Burton.

Are you and Fido ready to hit the road and make some memories? Adventures with a beloved canine companion can quickly go downhill without preparation. Here’s how to ensure you and your pooch will not only have the best of times, you won’t overspend in the process. 

Accessories to Ease Travel

A few well-chosen accessories can go a long way toward ensuring you and your dog stay comfortable and safe throughout your travels. There are bowls specially designed to collapse so meals and storage are easy-breezy, and car seat covers to protect your vehicle from hair, muddy paws, slobber, and any unexpected accidents.

When it comes to keeping your sidekick in his seat, choose a restraint that is fitting for your dog’s size and personality type. If you have a small dog who isn’t overly active, a booster seat or safety harness could be perfect. Bigger dogs can also enjoy the freedom and safety of a harness, and active dogs can benefit from a carrier or crate. 

For the accessories you and Fido need, stretch your travel budget by shopping online and using offers such as Ebates coupons and discount codes from your favorite retailers. You can apply the funds you save toward your and your dog’s fun.

Places to Go, Things to Do

Strange as it is to some of us, there are places that don’t welcome dogs. With that in mind, long before you pack Fido’s bags, do some research to ensure you and your pooch are heading somewhere you’ll both enjoy. And for those times you need to leave your dog alone, make arrangements for a trustworthy pet sitter to take care of your traveling companion. It’ll ease your mind knowing someone is tending him, rather than worrying that he’s stressed out. 

There are dog-friendly destinations far and wide for nearly anything that suits your fancy. If ocean waves, sands, and seagulls beckon, Travel + Leisure notes there are some outstanding dog-friendly beaches, such as the dog beach in Florida’s Fort Myers, Jekyll Island Beach in Georgia, and Topsail Beach in North Carolina. Exploring national parks can be big fun as well, but make sure you do some checking because some are more dog-friendly than others. More in the mood for urban adventures? Look to cities like Chicago, Seattle, or Denver. Finding places that encourage your pooch to be himself will ensure you make the most of every moment. 

When booking lodging, make reservations with pet-friendly hotels or vacation rentals. Websites like Expedia make it super simple to find the accommodations you want since you can search by pet-friendliness, and on top of that, joining their rewards program can stretch your budget. 

Bells and Whistles

You might be surprised to learn you don’t need to do all the driving when you reach your destination. You can save money by using public transportation in many locations; just verify restrictions before you and your pooch climb aboard, since some systems require a carrier. 

Along those same lines, it’s important to be conscientious of other travelers throughout your journey. If you and your dog are planning potentially muddy outings, like to a dog park or on hiking trails, bring along a paw washing device to tidy up before you hop into a bus, board a train, or re-enter your hotel. For example, the Dexas Mudbuster is small, convenient, and affordable, and you can explore their current offers to make the most of your money.

Of course, throughout your travels, you’ll want to clean up after your dog, so have a plan in place for dealing with waste. An economical solution is the GoGo Stik — it’s a clean, durable, efficient design, convenient to operate, and you can use any style bag so there is just the one-time purchase — all topped off with a money-back guarantee. 

Planning a getaway with your dog needn’t be complex or expensive. Accessorize appropriately, make arrangements in dog-friendly places, and grab a few gadgets to make comings and goings a breeze. With these smart strategies, you and your best friend will have a terrific time!

The Humanization of Pets?

Love this Pooch!

Really? A puppuccino at Starbucks? I don’t know about that but I sure just love this Pooch!  That said, the Pooch Craze is taking on a momentum. According to the APPA (American Pet Product Association), the pet industry has grown more than threefold in the last 20 years, from $23 billion in 1998 to $72 billion in 2018.

Accordingly, Corporate America is responding by offering pet perks such as veterinary insurance as an employee benefit, take-your-dog-to work days, and in some cases, “paw-ternity leave” and “fur-ternity leave” (paid time off for newly adopted pets). Housing developments are now even including dog play spaces and grooming salons, and wash areas. Haven’t you noticed that many hotels now provide pet-friendly accommodation? How about the pet friendly skies? My, how things have changed in the last forty years or so!

Pet parents (vs pet owners)? Yep. Here’s some new lingo: Fur parents with fur babies, and fur grandbabies?

As younger folks are waiting longer to have children or not, they’re adding furbabies to their new families!

Many say that their pets give them so much without expecting a return. Oh, and there’s nothing like a tail wagging pooch greeting you at the door when you return home from a long day at work!

Longing to Have a Beer with Your Pooch?

Longing to Have a Beer with Your Pooch?

Did you know that there are 15 different bars in Houston are selling a specially made beer for you and your pooch! Yes 3 different flavors developed by small business owners Megan and Steve Long.

In conversation, they respond to folks with these answers to the top three questions that typically come up.

  1. Is it really for dogs? (Yes.)
  2. Is it alcoholic? (No.)
  3. Can I drink it? (Um, sure?)

Will Good Boy Dog Beer show up in your bar?  about>  https://www.miamiherald.com/news/business/article219780955.html

 

Cases of dogs poisoned by marijuana rising where drug is legal

Cases of dogs poisoned by marijuana rising where drug is legal

In a recent article by ELLEN CHANDLER The Bulletin,

Cases of dogs poisoned by marijuana rising where drug is legal.
Veterinarians in Oregon say they have seen a serious increase in marijuana toxicity cases, usually in dogs, since recreational use of the drug was legalized. Many of the cases involve edible marijuana products, but a “little, tiny quantity — in some cases maybe a quarter of a gram, a tenth of a gram — can cause severe signs in some animals,” says veterinarian Adam Stone…

…So what to do if a dog gets high? Nitschelm and Stone advise pet owners to call their vet if it is still close to the time of ingestion, and induce vomiting according to the vet’s instructions. Waiting until the full effects of THC kick in means the pet may be too sedate to safely induce vomiting.

Once the toxin is out of the animal, take it immediately to the nearest open vet clinic.

“The typical treatment is inducing vomiting and then you give an anti-nausea medication to keep them from vomiting overnight,” Stone said.

The article also points out that “other common toxins that vets have treated recently include drugs such as ibuprofen, which can cause liver damage, kidney damage, even brain damage, and acetaminophen, which is fatal to cats.

Garlic, onions, grapes, raisins, dark chocolate and macadamia nuts are also toxic to dogs”.

Canine Autism and Vaccinations?

Canine Autism and Vaccinations?

Here is an outstanding article on this subject from Karin Brulliard is a national reporter who runs the Animalia blog. Previously, she was an international news editor; a foreign correspondent in South Africa, Pakistan and Israel; and a local reporter.

The British Veterinary Association, which represents thousands of practitioners in the United Kingdom, felt compelled to hop onto Twitter last week to issue a notable statement: “There’s currently no reliable scientific evidence to indicate autism in dogs (or its link to vaccines),” the group wrote.

The tweet came in response to a widely condemned call-out from the television show “Good Morning Britain” for interviews with pet owners who believe their dogs developed “canine autism” as a result of vaccines or who refuse routine shots over worries about side effects. But the association also suggested its response had roots across the Atlantic: “We are aware of an increase in anti-vaccination pet owners in the U.S.,” it said, “who have voiced concerns that vaccinations may lead to their dogs developing autism-like behavior.”

Has the anti-vaccine movement, which has fueled measles outbreaks in recent years, spread to American pets?

Not exactly, according to major veterinary groups in this country. John de Jong, a Boston-area veterinarian and incoming president of the American Veterinary Medical Association, said his organization firmly agrees with its British counterpart: There’s no evidence for autism in dogs or any link to vaccines — a theory that has been thoroughly discredited in humans. But he also said he has never been asked by a client about this notion, nor does he know of other veterinarians who have.

Heather Loenser, a senior veterinary officer with the American Animal Hospital Association, echoed that.

“I have never had a client voice that concern,” Loenser, who practices in New Jersey, wrote in an email, adding that she has only “seen it pop up on social media from time to time.”

No one tracks pet vaccination rates. That said, both Loenser and de Jong said they’ve seen small increases in clients who question the necessity or frequency of pet vaccinations. De Jong said some are influenced by breeders who tell buyers to wait on shots until after a dog has produced litters, while others express a vaguer skepticism about possible side effects.

More generally, he said, the doubts are reflective of a pet “humanization” trend that has driven a surge in organic and grain-free pet food sales, expensive and invasive end-of-life care, and doggy fitness centers.

“It’s fair to say that a lot of what we see in veterinary medicine seems to follow the curve of what’s popular in human medicine,” de Jong said. “The human-animal bond is at an all-time high, and people consider their pets as extended members of the family.”

The rabies vaccine is required by law for dogs and cats in most states. Other “core” vaccines, including those for distemper and parvovirus in dogs, are strongly recommended. They have been highly effective, veterinarians point out. Rabies has been eradicated in domestic canines, and distemper is extremely rare. De Jong said he treated dogs with parvovirus as a veterinary student in the early 1980s but now seldom sees it.

“If you take a look at the general health and longevity of both animals and people in society today, we have longer and healthier lives due to preventive medications, preventive health care, good diets and vaccines,” he said.

Vaccines can have minor side effects like swelling and very rarely more serious ones. And although pets typically are offered a series of immunizations, pet owners can discuss with their veterinarians which ones, other than rabies, are critical. A cat living in a high-rise condo, for example, might not need a vaccine for leukemia, de Jong said.

“Many of our North American colleagues believe, as I do, that vaccines should be tailored to the individual pet based on the animal’s risk factors and lifestyle,” said Loenser, whose organization offers an online “lifestyle-based vaccine calculator” to help guide owners’ conversations with their vets.

While de Jong said the veterinary association has detected no major cause for alarm about anti-vaccination-driven outbreaks in pets, he emphasized how much he hopes the idea doesn’t spread. Many diseases against which pets are immunized, such as rabies, can infect both animals and people.

“Widespread use of vaccines has prevented death and disease in millions and millions of animals,” he said. “The benefits far outweigh the risks, by a mile.”

What You Need to Know About Dog Flu!

Federal health experts say the worst of the country’s nastiest flu season in nearly 10 years is pretty much over.

But while many of us were following doctors orders on how to avoid influenza, many pet owners might not have realized that their canine friends have their own version of the flu, which is almost as bad.

And veterinarians across Florida have been seeing an increasing number of cases in recent months.

It’s caused by the H3N2 virus, which first cropped up in the United States in 2015.

Once dogs catch it, the viral disease makes them feel just as lousy as when humans get the flu. “They become lethargic. They have quite a distinct temperature rise,” says Dr. Colin Parrish, a virologist with the Baker Institute for Animal Health at Cornell University. But a continual cough that lasts for a long period of time is probably the clearest sign your dog has the flu.

The viral infection is most commonly spread when infected dogs cough and sneeze anyplace where other dogs are in close quarters, like kennels, dog parks, doggie daycare centers and grooming parlors.

For all the similarities between the human and canine influenzas, dogs rarely die from the disease. And humans can’t catch the strain from their dogs. But there is evidence that the H3N2 strain can be passed to domestic cats.

If you suspect your dog has the flu, experts say you should visit your veterinarian, who may suggest you quarantine the sick dog from anywhere between five days and three weeks, depending on the severity of the infection.

As with the human flu, there’s a vaccine available for canine influenza.

To learn more about the dog flu, please visit the website for the Baker Institute for Animal Health.