Archive for the Love Your Pet Category

Adopting a Pet During COVID-19_ 13 Things to Do First

Adopting a Pet During COVID-19? 13 Things to Do First

Pet adoptions are surging during the coronavirus pandemic, and it’s no wonder why: As families stay home to practice social distancing, many are realizing now is the perfect time to add a pet to the household.

But while the pandemic is temporary, a new pet is a long-term commitment. If you’re considering adopting a pet right now, here’s what you need to do first.

1. Ask yourself these eight questions before adopting a pet. 2. Get help choosing the right pet for your family’s lifestyle. 3. Understand the ins and outs of adopting a shelter pet. 4. Make a checklist of all the supplies you’ll need for your new pet. 5. Get essential training tips for first-time dog owners. 6. Learn the basics of grooming your new pet. 7. Buy a vacuum cleaner that can keep up with pet hair. 8. Find out how to deal with pesky house accidents and eliminate odor. 9. Make your backyard dog-friendly (and cat-friendly too!) 10. Decide if you’ll hire a dog walker. 11. Learn what to look for in a veterinarian. 12. Read up on the benefits of spaying or neutering your pet. 13. Understand how to keep your pet healthy for life.

Even if you decide now isn’t the right time to adopt, there’s still a way you can help pets and find companionship: fostering! Fostering saves lives and helps animal shelters during this difficult time. It’s also a great way to test out pet ownership to see if adding a four-legged family member is right for you! Reach out to your local animal shelter to find out what they’re

Cats, Dogs and Coronavirus: How Safe Are Your Pets?

Here’s what AVMA President Dr. John Howe says about people getting COVID from any domestic animal.

Man sitting in an armchair, holding his gorgeous pet cat

En Español

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, May 5, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Nadia, a tiger at New York City’s Bronx Zoo, tested positive for the coronavirus. A few pet cats in the United States (and maybe one dog) have, too.

And since the novel coronavirus causing the current pandemic is thought to have originated at a live animal market in China, some people have wondered if they need to worry about their own pets.

The good news is that any risk to humans from Fluffy or Fido is very low, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The bad news? Humans with COVID-19 infections could pose a slight risk to certain animals, such as cats or ferrets., but not dogs

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“There have really only been a handful of known domestic animal infections in the entire world,” said Dr. John Howe, president of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

“There are reports of a few cats in China and two dogs tested positive there, too,” Howe said. Several cats in the United States have also been diagnosed with the virus. Howe added that the animals all had minor symptoms.

And in one case — the first reported infection in a dog in the United States — Howe said he’s not convinced the dog even had any symptoms.

“It’s doubtful the dog [a pug] — was even ill. Pugs have upper respiratory problems anyway. It’s very easy for the test to pick up the presence of the virus in a dog’s mouth, but it doesn’t necessarily mean the dog was infected. The dog could have licked up the virus from any of the people in the household,” Howe explained.

Winston, the pug, was living with a family of four in North Carolina. One family member admitted that the pug was allowed to lick from the family’s plates. In a study at Duke University, three family members and Winston tested positive, according to news reports.

“A daughter, another dog and a cat didn’t test positive,” Howe said.

Not all animals are safe from COVID-19, however. Besides 4-year-old Nadia, four tigers and three lions at the Bronx Zoo reportedly contracted COVID. But leopards, cheetahs and cougars don’t seem to be susceptible, Howe said.

He said there was a report that Dutch workers on a mink farm transmitted the infection to the animals. And, Howe said, ferrets seem susceptible to the infection.

“There has been no evidence yet of people getting COVID from any domestic animal. Coronavirus is no reason to abandon your pets,” Howe said.

While it may be a relief to learn your pooch or feline probably can’t get you sick, there are still precautions you should take, particularly if you have a COVID-19 infection.

If you feel OK and take your dog out for a stroll, it’s important to practice social distancing guidelines, the CDC says. Keep your dog 6 feet from other people and animals. Try to keep your dog from interacting with other people or animals.

Howe said now is definitely not the time to walk your dog using a long, expandable leash. He and the CDC said dog parks are out for now, too.

The CDC says it’s ideal to keep cats indoors to prevent them from interacting with other people or animals.

What if someone pets your dog or cat?

Howe said pet hair tends to be porous and would likely trap virus particles. That means even if someone had virus particles on their hand when they touched your pet, you probably wouldn’t catch the virus by petting your animal, too.

Still, it’s a good idea to wipe the area with soap and water, or bathe your pet, if possible, Howe said. But never use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer on your pets, because they might lick it off, Howe said.

If you get sick with COVID-19, have another member of your household take over the pet care, if possible, the CDC says. Try to avoid contact with your pet as much as you can. This means no petting, snuggles, licks or sharing food or bedding with your furry pal while you’re sick.

“Just like you would with a child, try to have someone else take care of your pet, but if you have to, make sure you wear a mask around your pet,” Howe said.

The CDC also recommends washing your hands before and after interacting with your pet.

If you’ve been sick and then your pet seems ill, call your vet for advice.

More information

To learn more about the new coronavirus in pets, visit the American Veterinary Medical Association, or the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Healthy Pets, Healthy People website.

SOURCE: John Howe, D.V.M., president, American Veterinary Medical Association

Last Updated: May 5, 2020

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Think your pet needs CBD oil? Ask your veterinarian first

Think your pet needs CBD oil? Ask your veterinarian first

By Nicole Villalpando
Posted Jun 12, 2020 at 5:29 PM

Just like with humans, the advertising to use CBD oil for pets is everywhere. But how do you know how much to give, or if it even works?

Respected pet brands have been doing a lot of studies and research to see what the safe dosing levels should be and whether it actually works.

Dr. Stacy Mozisek of Firehouse Animal Health Center has been recommending CBD treats and oils for dogs and cats with mobility issues or anxiety.

For her, CBD products have been more effective for dogs with arthritis than the traditional joint supplements that have glucosamine as a beginning treatment before using a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug or a prescription medication. Omega fatty acids also can be a good first step.

She likes to get bloodwork done on a dog or cat before starting a CBD product to get a baseline, then test again a month or two later to make sure nothing has changed. A vet also will make sure your animal doesn’t have any condition or take any other medication that would make CBD not the right choice. Certain breeds, like toy breeds or breeds that have smushy faces like pugs, also are more sensitive to CBD products.

You should not use CBD oil products that are meant for humans on your pets. Those can have ingredients that are safe for humans but are toxic for pets, like the xylitol in chewing gum.

Mozisek says you want to use only pet-approved CBD products because they have dosing information based on the pet’s weight, which is very important. A pet cannot tell you how it makes them feel, such as whether it makes them feel too loopy or nauseated, or how much is too much.

Look for veterinary CBD products that have had third-party clinical trials.

The product Mozisek uses most is from ElleVet, which has had many clinical trials for mobility issues in dogs. It has not had as many trials for treating behavior such as anxiety. Those trials were put on pause because of COVID-19.

Mozisek still recommends trying a CBD product before going to something like a Prozac for dogs who are anxious about going to the groomer or in storms.

She is especially excited about CBD products for cats because cats don’t tolerate nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and there aren’t a lot of other medicines for cats with arthritis.

Instead of the CBD treats that work great for dogs, she uses an oil for cats that can go onto their food or directly into their mouth, if the cat will allow it.

Mozisek says a lot of arthritis in cats gets missed because we don’t walk them, but if you notice your cat isn’t jumping around as much that might be a sign he or she is hurting.

Still, CBD treats or oil might not be the solution a pet needs, which is why it’s important to see a vet before giving these products to pets. Sometimes doing things like helping the animal lose weight can help with arthritis better than the treats or oil would. Proper training for the pet (and the human) also could improve behavior more effectively than CBD or medication.

If you decide that CBD is the right choice, know that these products are not cheap. It’s about $100 a month for the dog treats and about $100 for the oil for cats, which will last one to two months.

CBD is “not a miracle drug,” Mozisek says. You shouldn’t expect that all their anxiety will go away or the arthritis will be fixed, but she has had clients who have stopped their dog’s other arthritis treatments after using CBD treats.

You won’t know if it will work on your pet until you field test it, she says.

5 Tips for Seniors Seeking Pet-Friendly Assisted Living

Source: Unsplash

5 Tips for Seniors Seeking Pet-Friendly Assisted Living

James Hall
Senior Care Fitness

Helping seniors live their best lives… because age is nothing but a number.

It can be difficult for seniors and their loved ones to make a decision about moving into an assisted living facility. Before relocating, there are lots of variables to consider, like cost, amenities provided, and the quality of care in different facilities. And some seniors may find themselves facing a dilemma when it’s finally time to move into assisted living: What will they do with their pets?

Senior pet owners should know that they don’t have to rehome their pets if they decide to move into an assisted living facility. While not all assisted living facilities accept pets, there are plenty that do. Here’s how to find a community that can be a home for both you and your pet.

Consider Your Needs

Naturally, you’re thinking about finding a facility where your pet can accompany you, but before you start your research, you need to consider your personal needs. What kind of medical care will you need? Which amenities and services will be essential for you? How much can you afford to spend on fees every month? Once you’ve figured out the answers to these important questions, it’s time to start looking into potential facilities.

Thorough Research

Now that you know exactly what you need in an assisted living facility, you can start looking for pet-friendly communities that fit all your other requirements. It helps to begin your initial search by asking your loved ones and members of any community groups you belong to for suggestions, but you should also feel free to use the internet to look up facilities in your area. Check out their websites to see if they have any specific policies in regards to pet ownership.

Take Several Tours

You might have your heart set on a certain community, but you won’t know if it’s the right fit for you until you visit in person. In fact, it’s best to tour a few different facilities before choosing one. Sixty and Me recommends asking the staff about the medical services the facility provides, whether you would have a shared or private room, and what kind of activities the residents can partake in. You should also ask about any pet amenities, such as open spaces for them to walk and play in. And don’t forget to ask about any pet ownership fees and breed restrictions!

Keep Your Space Clean

Once you arrive in your new community with your pet, you’ll both need to get used to some new routines, and regularly cleaning your space will have to be a priority. You’ll also want to take extra steps to prevent your pet from getting fleas. Introducing fleas into an assisted living community could be a serious health issue for residents.

If you have a dog, applying flea medication is one way to keep your pet healthy and protected. However, you’ll want to research the health risks and side effects of any flea medication you choose, as some can pose hazards to pets and humans. It’s important to select a medication that is both effective and safe.

Social Adjustment

Chances are that your pet is a little bit intimidated with so many strangers around, so it’s your job to help them relax and make friends! As you help your pet get into a predictable daily routine in their new home, you should also try to introduce them to new people in a manner that makes them feel comfortable. The Spruce suggests telling visitors to ignore your pet when they enter your space and allowing your pet to go up to them when they feel at ease. Give them treats to reward them for positive interactions.

Selecting an assisted living facility is a very important decision. And if you’re a senior who also happens to be a pet owner, it’s perfectly understandable that you would want to bring your animal companion along with you. By touring multiple facilities and asking the right questions, you can find a new home in a community where your pet will be welcome, too.

Budget-Friendly Tips for Getaways with Your Furry Best Friend





Image courtesy of Unsplash

This guest article was written by Nick Burton.

Are you and Fido ready to hit the road and make some memories? Adventures with a beloved canine companion can quickly go downhill without preparation. Here’s how to ensure you and your pooch will not only have the best of times, you won’t overspend in the process. 

Accessories to Ease Travel

A few well-chosen accessories can go a long way toward ensuring you and your dog stay comfortable and safe throughout your travels. There are bowls specially designed to collapse so meals and storage are easy-breezy, and car seat covers to protect your vehicle from hair, muddy paws, slobber, and any unexpected accidents.

When it comes to keeping your sidekick in his seat, choose a restraint that is fitting for your dog’s size and personality type. If you have a small dog who isn’t overly active, a booster seat or safety harness could be perfect. Bigger dogs can also enjoy the freedom and safety of a harness, and active dogs can benefit from a carrier or crate. 

For the accessories you and Fido need, stretch your travel budget by shopping online and using offers such as Ebates coupons and discount codes from your favorite retailers. You can apply the funds you save toward your and your dog’s fun.

Places to Go, Things to Do

Strange as it is to some of us, there are places that don’t welcome dogs. With that in mind, long before you pack Fido’s bags, do some research to ensure you and your pooch are heading somewhere you’ll both enjoy. And for those times you need to leave your dog alone, make arrangements for a trustworthy pet sitter to take care of your traveling companion. It’ll ease your mind knowing someone is tending him, rather than worrying that he’s stressed out. 

There are dog-friendly destinations far and wide for nearly anything that suits your fancy. If ocean waves, sands, and seagulls beckon, Travel + Leisure notes there are some outstanding dog-friendly beaches, such as the dog beach in Florida’s Fort Myers, Jekyll Island Beach in Georgia, and Topsail Beach in North Carolina. Exploring national parks can be big fun as well, but make sure you do some checking because some are more dog-friendly than others. More in the mood for urban adventures? Look to cities like Chicago, Seattle, or Denver. Finding places that encourage your pooch to be himself will ensure you make the most of every moment. 

When booking lodging, make reservations with pet-friendly hotels or vacation rentals. Websites like Expedia make it super simple to find the accommodations you want since you can search by pet-friendliness, and on top of that, joining their rewards program can stretch your budget. 

Bells and Whistles

You might be surprised to learn you don’t need to do all the driving when you reach your destination. You can save money by using public transportation in many locations; just verify restrictions before you and your pooch climb aboard, since some systems require a carrier. 

Along those same lines, it’s important to be conscientious of other travelers throughout your journey. If you and your dog are planning potentially muddy outings, like to a dog park or on hiking trails, bring along a paw washing device to tidy up before you hop into a bus, board a train, or re-enter your hotel. For example, the Dexas Mudbuster is small, convenient, and affordable, and you can explore their current offers to make the most of your money.

Of course, throughout your travels, you’ll want to clean up after your dog, so have a plan in place for dealing with waste. An economical solution is the GoGo Stik — it’s a clean, durable, efficient design, convenient to operate, and you can use any style bag so there is just the one-time purchase — all topped off with a money-back guarantee. 

Planning a getaway with your dog needn’t be complex or expensive. Accessorize appropriately, make arrangements in dog-friendly places, and grab a few gadgets to make comings and goings a breeze. With these smart strategies, you and your best friend will have a terrific time!

GoGo Stik Review, “I just love this, I bought two…”

 January 15, 2016
I have 5 dogs and I can tell you I have tried everything for this nasty chore. I just love this, I bought two!! Actually, two works for me perfectly.
I use one in my right hand to scoop into the one in my left hand, then after that one is full I am free to load the right hand stick, not having to go back to base to get more bags. Since I am tall, I would like one just a little longer, but I highly recommend this product. The customer service is wonderful too! Looking forward to future products. Thanks!!!