GoGo Blog!

A dog-friendly place.

…he goes directly in the bag. No scooping required.

Hello Alec, Had a chance to give the gogostik a test & it works great for my purposes. I have a small dog, I take him for walks twice a day and he goes directly in the bag. No scooping required, just dispose of the bag. I only have a small supply of bags that came with the gogostik so I would like to purchase a larger supply to have on hand, possibly a case of 500 bags or so. Please let me know if I can purchase a bulk amount of bags; if so how many and the price. Need ASAP.
Thanks,
Peggy

I have two female dachunds…I can not bend while I am healing from my back surgery…

Hi Alec,
I have two female dachounds. Since I can not bend while I am healing from my back surgery I hesitated to walk my dogs. I had no idea how I was going to pick up poop. Yesterday I tried the GoGo stick out for the first time. It worked great! I could pick up the poop without bending and everything went right in the bag I had attached to the stick. I was very happy to be able to avoid any mess. Thank you so much. Martha

GoGo Stik – DISABLED PEOPLE NEED THIS PRODUCT !!!

By E.W.
I am a disabled veteran in a wheelchair. I recently received a Service dog and was at a loss as to how I would clean up after him. I no longer have the hand strength or dexterity to use traditional scoopers with jaws. I can’t squeeze them open. I finally found this product and it is amazing. And since I can’t bend over due to the wheelchair and my brain injury, the extension handle allows me to easily reach and scoop up my dog’s messes. Trust me, you need this product!

We slip this bad boy under his rear and play “catch the poo” …


By Lisa D.
Size: ST MODEL 25″-35″|Verified Purchase
We buy a lot of things from Amazon, but this is by far, the most used item we’ve ever bought. We purchased our first one a little over a year ago and used it every single day, a few times a day. We don’t have a yard, so we walk our poochie. When he squats, we slip this bad boy under his rear and play “catch the poo” – as can bee seen in the attached photo. Our doggo doesn’t seem to mind it one bit. Far better than bending over and picking up warm squishy stuff with bag-gloved hand. If you have to scoop any up from the ground, the shovel shaped head makes it fairy easy to scoop up with some maneuvering. It works best with Out! brand large, handled heavy duty bags. Standard bags can be used, but don’t secure onto the stick as easily. You can even use plastic bags from the grocery store, but they can be bulky if you’re playing “catch the poo”.

After a little over a year, we purchased a second one because the mechanism that keeps the extender in the locked position wore out. Definitely got our moneys worth out of the first one. Will gladly purchase a third in another year or so if this one wears out.

Testimonial From a “Catchin’!” GoGo Stik User

From L. Tiboldo

Message: Great product. I started using an early version of the Go Go Stick almost two years ago after having a fall and was having trouble cleaning up after our SharPei.

My daughter saw the Stick on line and immediately had one sent to me as a St. Valentine Day’s gift. (some gift)

Little did I think it would turn out so great. The very first time I took the dog out with the stick it worked out. Not want to create a mess of things, I stuck the Stick (bag end) under the dog while he was going. He turned his head around to check it out and that began years of success with it. Since that day all we have to do is wait for him to squat and he goes right in the bag. His deposit never touches the ground, or anything else but the inside of the bag. Simply great. Thanks so much.

Canine Autism and Vaccinations?

Canine Autism and Vaccinations?

Here is an outstanding article on this subject from Karin Brulliard is a national reporter who runs the Animalia blog. Previously, she was an international news editor; a foreign correspondent in South Africa, Pakistan and Israel; and a local reporter.

The British Veterinary Association, which represents thousands of practitioners in the United Kingdom, felt compelled to hop onto Twitter last week to issue a notable statement: “There’s currently no reliable scientific evidence to indicate autism in dogs (or its link to vaccines),” the group wrote.

The tweet came in response to a widely condemned call-out from the television show “Good Morning Britain” for interviews with pet owners who believe their dogs developed “canine autism” as a result of vaccines or who refuse routine shots over worries about side effects. But the association also suggested its response had roots across the Atlantic: “We are aware of an increase in anti-vaccination pet owners in the U.S.,” it said, “who have voiced concerns that vaccinations may lead to their dogs developing autism-like behavior.”

Has the anti-vaccine movement, which has fueled measles outbreaks in recent years, spread to American pets?

Not exactly, according to major veterinary groups in this country. John de Jong, a Boston-area veterinarian and incoming president of the American Veterinary Medical Association, said his organization firmly agrees with its British counterpart: There’s no evidence for autism in dogs or any link to vaccines — a theory that has been thoroughly discredited in humans. But he also said he has never been asked by a client about this notion, nor does he know of other veterinarians who have.

Heather Loenser, a senior veterinary officer with the American Animal Hospital Association, echoed that.

“I have never had a client voice that concern,” Loenser, who practices in New Jersey, wrote in an email, adding that she has only “seen it pop up on social media from time to time.”

No one tracks pet vaccination rates. That said, both Loenser and de Jong said they’ve seen small increases in clients who question the necessity or frequency of pet vaccinations. De Jong said some are influenced by breeders who tell buyers to wait on shots until after a dog has produced litters, while others express a vaguer skepticism about possible side effects.

More generally, he said, the doubts are reflective of a pet “humanization” trend that has driven a surge in organic and grain-free pet food sales, expensive and invasive end-of-life care, and doggy fitness centers.

“It’s fair to say that a lot of what we see in veterinary medicine seems to follow the curve of what’s popular in human medicine,” de Jong said. “The human-animal bond is at an all-time high, and people consider their pets as extended members of the family.”

The rabies vaccine is required by law for dogs and cats in most states. Other “core” vaccines, including those for distemper and parvovirus in dogs, are strongly recommended. They have been highly effective, veterinarians point out. Rabies has been eradicated in domestic canines, and distemper is extremely rare. De Jong said he treated dogs with parvovirus as a veterinary student in the early 1980s but now seldom sees it.

“If you take a look at the general health and longevity of both animals and people in society today, we have longer and healthier lives due to preventive medications, preventive health care, good diets and vaccines,” he said.

Vaccines can have minor side effects like swelling and very rarely more serious ones. And although pets typically are offered a series of immunizations, pet owners can discuss with their veterinarians which ones, other than rabies, are critical. A cat living in a high-rise condo, for example, might not need a vaccine for leukemia, de Jong said.

“Many of our North American colleagues believe, as I do, that vaccines should be tailored to the individual pet based on the animal’s risk factors and lifestyle,” said Loenser, whose organization offers an online “lifestyle-based vaccine calculator” to help guide owners’ conversations with their vets.

While de Jong said the veterinary association has detected no major cause for alarm about anti-vaccination-driven outbreaks in pets, he emphasized how much he hopes the idea doesn’t spread. Many diseases against which pets are immunized, such as rabies, can infect both animals and people.

“Widespread use of vaccines has prevented death and disease in millions and millions of animals,” he said. “The benefits far outweigh the risks, by a mile.”

What You Need to Know About Dog Flu!

Federal health experts say the worst of the country’s nastiest flu season in nearly 10 years is pretty much over.

But while many of us were following doctors orders on how to avoid influenza, many pet owners might not have realized that their canine friends have their own version of the flu, which is almost as bad.

And veterinarians across Florida have been seeing an increasing number of cases in recent months.

It’s caused by the H3N2 virus, which first cropped up in the United States in 2015.

Once dogs catch it, the viral disease makes them feel just as lousy as when humans get the flu. “They become lethargic. They have quite a distinct temperature rise,” says Dr. Colin Parrish, a virologist with the Baker Institute for Animal Health at Cornell University. But a continual cough that lasts for a long period of time is probably the clearest sign your dog has the flu.

The viral infection is most commonly spread when infected dogs cough and sneeze anyplace where other dogs are in close quarters, like kennels, dog parks, doggie daycare centers and grooming parlors.

For all the similarities between the human and canine influenzas, dogs rarely die from the disease. And humans can’t catch the strain from their dogs. But there is evidence that the H3N2 strain can be passed to domestic cats.

If you suspect your dog has the flu, experts say you should visit your veterinarian, who may suggest you quarantine the sick dog from anywhere between five days and three weeks, depending on the severity of the infection.

As with the human flu, there’s a vaccine available for canine influenza.

To learn more about the dog flu, please visit the website for the Baker Institute for Animal Health.

My dogs love pooping on people’s yards

Best thing ever
By Cam K.
Size: 25″-35″|Verified Purchase
This gogo stik is the best thing ever. So convenient. I take it with me on walks. My dogs love pooping on people’s yards and I hate having to pull them mid-poop. With this stik I can just place it under their bum and catch it all. I’m happy, my neighbors are happy and more importantly my dogs are happy.

Will you soon be able to provide pot for your pooch?

ALBANY — Will you soon be able to provide pot for your pooch?

Assemblywoman Amy Paulin, D-Scarsdale, Westchester County, introduced legislation Thursday that would change New York law to allow veterinarians to prescribe medical marijuana to animals.

“Medical marijuana has helped countless people in the management and treatment of chronic and debilitating illnesses,” Paulin’s bill states.

“Research suggests that animals can also benefit from cannabis use to similarly treat their ailments.”

Nevada and California are also considering legislation to legalize medical marijuana for animals, saying it could help pets with chronic illnesses.

“Animal owners and caregivers would therefore be given an alternative option to alleviate their pets’ pain,” Paulin’s bill said.

“This could be helpful to many animals in need of relief, especially those that have chronic illnesses and for whom more traditional medical treatment has not proven to be effective.”

The bill may face an uphill battle with the Legislature and Gov. Andrew Cuomo. The measure has yet to gain a Senate sponsor, and Cuomo has moved cautiously with expanding the state’s medical marijuana program.

New York first started to allow doctors to prescribe medical marijuana in non-smokeable forms in January 2016, but the program has struggled.

As a result, the state has expanded the types of conditions that can be treated with medical marijuana, let nurse practitioners prescribe it and wants to double the number of dispensaries to 40.

The program currently has 1,500 registered practitioners and about 47,600 patients. according to the state Health Department.

Cuomo indicated in January that New York will also study whether to legalize recreational marijuana.

“This is an important topic, it is a hotly debated topic — pardon the pun — and it would be nice to have some facts in the middle of the debate once in a while,” Cuomo said in his budget address.